Types of Wrongful Termination: Common Scenarios and Violations

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Types of Wrongful Termination: Common Scenarios and Violations

Types of Wrongful Termination: Common Scenarios and Violations

Introduction

Wrongful termination is a serious violation of an employee’s rights, and it occurs when an employer unlawfully terminates an employee. Understanding the various types of wrongful termination scenarios and violations is crucial for employees to recognize their rights and seek legal remedies. This article aims to provide an overview of the common scenarios and violations that can lead to wrongful termination, highlighting the importance of employment law in protecting workers.

Discrimination-Based Wrongful Termination
Discrimination-based wrongful termination occurs when an employee is fired based on their protected characteristics, such as:

a) Race or Ethnicity: Terminating an employee because of their race, skin color, or ethnic background is a clear violation of anti-discrimination laws.

b) Gender or Sex: Firing an employee due to their gender or sexual orientation is prohibited by laws such as Title VII of the Civil Rights Act.

c) Age: Age discrimination occurs when an employer terminates an employee based on their age, typically affecting older workers protected under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA).

d) Disability: Dismissing an employee due to their disability, despite their ability to perform the essential job functions with reasonable accommodations, is a violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

e) Religion: Firing an employee because of their religious beliefs or practices infringes upon their rights protected by Title VII.

Retaliation-Based Wrongful Termination
Retaliation-based wrongful termination takes place when an employer fires an employee in retaliation for exercising their legal rights or engaging in protected activities, such as:

a) Whistleblowing: Terminating an employee for reporting illegal activities, health and safety violations, or other wrongdoing within the organization is unlawful under whistleblower protection laws.

b) Workplace Complaints: Firing an employee for filing complaints regarding workplace harassment, discrimination, or hostile work environments is a violation of anti-retaliation laws.

c) Family and Medical Leave: Wrongfully terminating an employee for taking approved leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) is prohibited.

d) Union Activities: Dismissing an employee for participating in union activities or exercising their rights under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) is a violation of labor laws.

Breach of Contract
Breach of contract wrongful termination occurs when an employer terminates an employee in violation of an employment contract. This type of termination typically involves:

a) Written Employment Contracts: If an employee has a written employment contract that specifies the terms and conditions of their employment, the employer must adhere to those terms. Wrongfully terminating an employee in violation of the contract can lead to a breach of contract claim.

b) Implied Contracts: In some cases, even in the absence of a written contract, employers may create implied contracts through verbal assurances, company policies, or established practices. Terminating an employee in violation of these implied contracts may be considered wrongful termination.

Violation of Public Policy
Violation of public policy wrongful termination occurs when an employer fires an employee for reasons that go against fundamental public policies. Some examples include:

a) Exercising Legal Rights: Firing an employee for exercising their legal rights, such as taking time off to serve on a jury or fulfilling military obligations, is a violation of public policy.

b) Refusing Illegal Acts: Terminating an employee who refuses to engage in illegal activities, such as fraudulent practices or discrimination, is against public policy.

c) Reporting Legal Violations: Firing an employee for reporting legal violations within the company or to appropriate authorities is a violation of public policy.

Constructive Discharge
Constructive discharge occurs when an employer creates such intolerable working conditions that an employee is effectively forced to resign. While it is not a direct termination, it is considered a wrongful termination scenario because the employee is essentially left with no other option but to quit.

Conclusion

Understanding the various types of wrongful termination scenarios and violations is essential for employees to recognize their rights and seek legal remedies. Discrimination-based wrongful termination, retaliation-based wrongful termination, breach of contract, violation of public policy, and constructive discharge are among the common scenarios that can result in wrongful termination. If you believe you have been wrongfully terminated, consult with an experienced employment law attorney to assess your case, protect your rights, and seek justice. Employment laws play a crucial role in safeguarding workers and ensuring fair treatment in the workplace.

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We are not afraid to litigate and take cases to trial, and have trial experience. We are relentless and we win. Clients also have first-hand access to our attorneys who are available day or night and will even provide you with their cell phone numbers. Case updates come straight from your attorney rather than paralegals or staff members.

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